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Obesity Risk DNA Test

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  • Obesity Risk DNA Test

Obesity Risk DNA Test

Home DNA Test Kit for Predisposition to Obesity

1 test per pack REF:V9022-006

Our new Obesity Risk DNA test kit shows whether you are genetically predisposed to being over weight.

  • The test can tell you how your body reacts to fat.
  • Analyses four ‘Fat’ genes: FTO, PPARG, APOA5 and FABP2
  • Included: easy to follow instructions, a swab and a return envelope.
  • Up to 10 days for our laboratory to test the sample
£19.99
- +
Hurry! Only 16 left in stock

Obesity Risk DNA Test


Home DNA Test Kit for Predisposition to Obesity


A Home DNA test to show if you are genetically predisposed to being overweight


If you find that you put weight on easily, this may be because you have a genetic predisposition to being overweight. Studies have shown that obesity is influenced not only by environmental factors, but that there is also a strong hereditary link associated with the condition. Susceptibility to common obesity is believed to be affected by many genes that affect both your appetite and the way your body reacts when you eat different types of fats.


Our new Obesity Risk DNA test kit will show you if you are genetically predisposed to being over-weight. Knowing your genetic profile and susceptibility to weight gain can provide long term health benefits. It enables you to influence your BMI and blood lipids by regulating your dietary fat intake and your physical activity. It will encourage you to manage your diet and increase your exercise to control your weight. This will help you to prevent illnesses normally associated with being overweight developing, such as Diabetes, High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular problems. 


How does our test work? Well, by looking at a combination of four genes, our test can tell you how your body reacts to fat. These genes each interact with fat in a different way, and by looking at them individually the DNA test your susceptibility to weight gain can be determined.


Our test analyses four different ‘Fat’ genes called FTO, PPARG, APOA5 and FABP2. The first gene, FTO provides information about whether you carry a predisposition toward excess weight and whether you will get a greater benefit from physical activity. The PPARG gene shows how your Body Mass Index (BMI) can be affected by a diet rich in monounsaturated fats, whilst the APOA5 gene shows how BMI can be affected by a high fat diet. The FABP2 gene shows whether you are predisposed to, or have a greater risk of having high levels of blood fats, including cholesterol. Further information about the genetic control of obesity is available here


Everything you need for the test is included in the kit, including easy to follow instructions, a swab and a return envelope.


To take the test simply:  



  1. Rinse your mouth with water  

  2. Open the box, which contains a cotton swab in a plastic tube and an instruction leaflet. Carefully remove the sticker including the analysis code from the package leaflet and attach it to the paper/plastic package that contains the cotton bud. Open the upper part of the package and pull out the cotton swab.  

  3. Insert the swab into your mouth and rub the cotton end of the swab against the inside of your cheek.  

  4. Place the cotton swab in its packaging and then into the kit box and seal it. Then place the swab in its packaging into the Freepost* addressed envelope supplied, and post it back to us for testing.


Please leave 7-10 days for our laboratory to test your sample. You can check the status of your test and obtain your test results, using the website address and your test's unique code number provided with the test.


* Applies only to customers in the United Kingdom


About Obesity Risk


Predisposition to Obesity


If you find that you put weight on easily, it might be because of your genes. There is a strong hereditary link with propensity to gain weight as your genes affect both your appetite and the way your body reacts when you eat different types of fats. Information about how susceptible you are to weight gain can have long term health benefits. It will encourage you to manage your diet and increase your exercise to reduce the chances of becoming overweight. This will help prevent you developing illnesses normally associated with obesity, such as Diabetes, High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular problems. 


The ‘Fat’ genes


Obesity is a complex disease resulting from a variety of hereditary and environmental factors, and can cause serious health issues. Our DNA test analyses four different genes, FTO, PPARG, APOA5 and FABP2. The first gene, FTO provides information about whether you carry a predisposition toward excess weight and will get a greater benefit from exercise. PPARG shows how your BMI can be affected by taking a diet rich in monounsaturated fats. APOA5 shows how BMI can be affected by a high fat diet. FABP2 shows whether there is predisposition to high levels of blood fats.


Your Body Mass Index (BMI)


Excess weight and obesity have been shown to be a risk factor for many other diseases, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The BMI (Body Mass Index), which is calculated by dividing your weight by your height is used to assess how healthy your weight is and your risk of developing obesity related diseases. You can calculate your BMI using the NHS Choices BMI Healthy Weight Calculator. A BMI between 25-30 kg/m2 is characterised as overweight and a BMI over 30 kg/m2 as obese.  


The FTO Gene, BMI and Exercise


The Fat Mass and Obesity Associated gene, called FTO is a well described gene that may be linked to excess weight and obesity is found on chromosome 16. The FTO gene is expressed primarily in the brain and it is thought to be linked to appetite and food intake. In our test we look at a specific position in the gene that occurs in two variants, the A-allele and T-allele (rs9939609). The A-allele of the gene produces a protein that does not function and individuals who are carriers of the A-allele in duplicate are shown in a large meta-study as running a 40-60% higher risk of excess weight and obesity. It has also been shown that carriers of this gene variant can reduce the risk of excess weight by up to 30% through physical activity. Therefore, people with this gene variant can, with the help of proper diet and exercise, almost completely eliminate the genetically increased risk of obesity. 


The PPARG and APOA5 genes, BMI and Dietary Fat


There are a number of genes that influence how we react to different types of fat in food. In our test, we focus on the PPARG and AOPA5 genes. 


The PPARG gene affects the metabolism of fats and is expressed in your adipose tissue. People with the gene variant (GG) PPARG (rs1801282) tend to have a lower BMI when their diet contains a higher proportion of monounsaturated fat. Monounsaturated fat is found in olive oil, nuts, avocados and chicken. A diet rich in monounsaturated fats is often called the ‘Mediterranean diet’. Individuals with this gene variant can actively reduce their BMI by changing their intake of fats by eat more monounsaturated fats rather than food containing saturated fats.


The APOA5 gene is linked to the regulation of fats and storage of fat in fat cells and so has a role in the development of obesity. In this test we examine the presence of T>C at position 1131 in the gene (rs662799). Studies have shown that people with a particular gene variant (CC) of the APOA5 gene do not have a high BMI even if their diet contains a lot of fat. These people tend to have a reduced BMI with a high fat diet. However, those individuals who do not have this gene variant tend to have an increased BMI and risk of excess weight or obesity with a high-fat diet.


The FABP2 gene, and Blood Lipids


Blood lipids, such as cholesterol are important building blocks in the body, but at high levels they can also be risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The FABP2 gene (Fatty Acid Binding Protein) encodes for an intracellular protein that affects the amount of fat in the blood and individuals with a particular gene variant of FABP2 gene (rs1799883) may have an increased amount of triglycerides and LDL (bad cholesterol), as well as a reduced amount of HDL (good cholesterol) in their blood. Blood fats are not only controlled by genes, but for individuals with this gene variant it is especially important to think about replacing saturated and trans fats with unsaturated fats to improve the levels of blood lipids.


Genes are one of many factors that affect our BMI and our diets but regardless of which genetic variations you carry it is important to remember that a balanced diet and regular physical activity are important for our health. It is also important to remember that there are individual differences between individuals even if they carry the same gene variations in these genes 


Obesity Risk DNS Test – Frequently Asked Questions


How do my genes affect how susceptible I am to weight gain?


There is a strong hereditary link with propensity to gain weight as your genes affect both your appetite and the way your body reacts when you eat different types of fats


What does the FTO gene tell me?


The Fat Mass and Obesity Associated gene, called FTO is thought to be linked to appetite and food intake. People with the A variant of the gene run a 40-60% higher risk of excess weight and obesity. It has also been shown that carriers of this gene variant can reduce the risk of excess weight by up to 30% through physical activity. Therefore, people with this gene variant can, with the help of proper diet and exercise, almost completely eliminate the genetically increased risk of obesity


What does the PPARG gene tell me?


The PPARG gene affects the metabolism of fats. People with the GG variant tend to have a lower BMI when their diet contains a higher proportion of monounsaturated fat - the ‘Mediterranean diet’. Individuals with this gene variant can actively reduce their BMI by changing their intake of fats by eating more monounsaturated fats


What does the APOA5 gene tell me?


The APOA5 gene is linked to the regulation of fats and storage of fat in fat cells and so has a role in the development of obesity. People with the CC variant of the APOA5 gene do not have a high BMI even if their diet contains a lot of fat . Those without the CC variant have a higher susceptibility to weight gain and risk of obesity.


What does the FSBP2 gene tell me? 


The FABP2 gene encodes for a type of protein called Fatty Acid Binding Protein that affects the amount of fat in the blood. People with the rs1799883 variant may have an increased amount of triglycerides and LDL (bad cholesterol), as well as a reduced amount of HDL (good cholesterol) in their blood. They should consider replacing saturated and trans fats with unsaturated fats to improve their levels of blood lipids.


How accurate is the test?


Your DNA sample is analysed in a laboratory and the result is 99.5% accurate.


How is the sample for the test taken?


A simple saliva sample is taken with the special cotton swab provided.


Where can I find the instructions for how to take the sample?


You will find the instructions on the tab surrounding the box. Open the tab on the side of the box on which are printed; “instructions open here”.


How is the sample sent to the laboratory?


Simply remove the parts of the box containing the instructions and the display hook on top of the box by tearing along its perforated edges. To send your sample swab to our laboratory for testing, simply place the swab in the plastic packaging in the addressed envelope provided to return it to us prepaid.


How do I get my result? 


Your test result can be downloaded from the Dynamic Code website (https://www.dynamiccode.com/en/get-test-result) using the unique code provided in the kit.


Is everything I need for the test included in the kit? 


Yes, everything you need to take the test is included in the kit; instructions, swab, a return envelope and a unique code to get your result from the Dynamic Code website.


How quickly will I receive my test result 


The test needs to be performed in our laboratory so please allow 7 to 10 days for this work to be completed.

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Test Procedure Steps

  • 1Simply take a swab of your saliva.

  • 2Post the swab back to us for testing.

  • 3The DNA test is performed within a                                few days.

  • 4Check your results on the website.

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